Archive for the ‘Community building’ Category

World Wide Web Consortium Issues RDF and OWL Recommendations

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

Semantic Web emerges as commercial-grade infrastructure for sharing data on the Web

10 February 2004 — Today, the World Wide Web Consortium announced final approval of two key Semantic Web technologies, the revised Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the Web Ontology Language (OWL). RDF and OWL are Semantic Web standards that provide a framework for asset management, enterprise integration and the sharing and reuse of data on the Web. These standard formats for data sharing span application, enterprise, and community boundaries – all of these different types of “user” can share the same information, even if they don’t share the same software.

http://www.w3.org/2004/01/sws-pressrelease

Today’s announcement marks the emergence of the Semantic Web as a broad-based, commercial-grade platform for data on the Web. The deployment of these standards in commercial products and services signals the transition of Semantic Web technology from what was largely a research and advanced development project over the last five years, to more practical technology deployed in mass market tools that enables more flexible access to structured data on the Web. Testimonials from enterprise-scale implementors and independent developers illustrate current uses of these standards on the Web today.

“RDF and OWL make a strong foundation for Semantic Web applications,” said Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web. “Their approval as W3C Recommendations come at a time when new products spring up in areas as diverse as Enterprise Integration and medical decision support. It’s not unlike the early days of the Web, when once people saw how it worked, they understood its power. We’re entering that phase now, where people can see the beginnings of the Semantic Web at work.”

A World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Recommendation is understood by industry and the Web community at large as a Web standard. Each Recommendation is a stable specification developed by a W3C Working Group and reviewed by the W3C Membership. Recommendations promote interoperability of Web technologies of the Web by explicitly conveying the industry consensus formed by the Working Group.

 

Semantic Web

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

The Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries. It is a collaborative effort led by W3C with participation from a large number of researchers and industrial partners. It is based on the Resource Description Framework (RDF). See also the separate FAQ for further information.

http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/

my foaf

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

http://www.danielprendergast.co.uk/foaf.rdf

 

Click to the clique

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

Forget the plonk and canapes, make your new contacts via the ether, says Ben Hammersley

Thursday January 9, 2003
The Guardian

I blame Kevin Bacon. It’s only fair: he probably doesn’t know it, but the floppy fringed actor’s influence on the internet has been long felt, if unusual – and this year it’s everywhere.What are we talking about? Social networks. Now, don’t get all huffy. The influence of the one out of Footloose your sister fancied is not to be underestimated. Sure, it was the US sociologist Stanley Milgram who developed what he called the “Small World Hypothesis”, which said, in effect, that everyone was connected to everyone else by six degrees or less – but it was the famous Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon online game site that firmly implanted the obscure scientific theory into the hive mind of the internet.

http://technology.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,870848,00.html

The Friend of a Friend (FOAF) project.

Wednesday, May 30th, 2007

The Friend of a Friend (FOAF) project is creating a Web of machine-readable pages describing people, the links between them and the things they create and do.

FOAF is about your place in the Web, and the Web’s place in our world. FOAF is a simple technology that makes it easier to share and use information about people and their activities (eg. photos, calendars, weblogs), to transfer information between Web sites, and to automatically extend, merge and re-use it online.

http://www.foaf-project.org/

Web 2.0 wonders: Yelp

Monday, April 9th, 2007
By Darren Waters
Technology editor, BBC News website
The web has evolved into an indispensable tool for our daily lives. But who are the people driving this growth? All this week the BBC News website is speaking to young, talented web pioneers working in Silicon Valley and beyond.

When Jeremy Stoppelman was 14 years old he had a subscription to Forbes magazine and dabbled in the stock market.

His ambition was to one day run his own company and be featured in his magazine of choice. Fifteen years later and both goals have been accomplished.

Mr Stoppelman is the co-founder and chief executive of Yelp.com, easily the internet’s most sophisticated solution to finding local information and reliable reviews of services.

“I was a computer nerd but also investing in stocks in high school,” he says.

More…

Web 2.0 wonders: Meebo

Monday, April 9th, 2007
By Darren Waters
Technology editor, BBC News website
The web has evolved into an indispensable tool for our daily lives. But who are the people driving this growth? All this week the BBC News website is speaking to young, talented web pioneers working in Silicon Valley and beyond.
“When we put it out we did not know if anyone would like it; we just knew that it solved our problem,” explains Seth Sternberg, 28, chief executive and co-founder of Meebo.com.

The “it” in question is Meebo, a web-based instant messaging (IM) system which lets users send and receive messages from a number of different IM services, such as AOL, MSN, Yahoo and Jabber.

It is an elegant solution to the problem of having multiple accounts – many of which are not interoperable – and requiring different software downloads.

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Web 2.0 wonders: Zooomr’s Kris Tate

Monday, April 9th, 2007
By Darren Waters
Technology editor, BBC News website
The web has evolved into an indispensable tool for our daily lives. But who are the people driving this growth? All this week the BBC News website is speaking to young, talented web pioneers working in Silicon Valley and beyond.
What do you do if you are a 17-year-old programming genius living in Seattle, in the US? Do you work for Microsoft, the largest software company in the world with billions of dollars in resources and a clear career path?

Or do you move away from your family, 800 miles south to San Francisco and single-handedly build a photo-sharing website that will eventually have 100,000 users around the world?

Kris Tate, a softly-spoken and impossibly polite teenager, did the latter.

Now 18 years old, Tate is the coding expert responsible for Zooomr, one of the most popular photo websites on the net.

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Platial

Monday, January 15th, 2007

platial.com

Who would have guessed that sticking pins in maps would become such a cool internet thing? Using the technology of Google Earth and Yahoo Maps, Platial lets users create a personalised atlas where they can enter hobbies, thoughts and travel destinations onto a map for others to see. See UFO sightings, vegan friendly cafes and great music maps – amongst other things..

http://www.platial.com